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Drew Thies

The last presidential primary was held Tuesday, June 14, in Washington, D.C., marking the end of the party nomination elections for the nation’s highest office.

The two presumptive nominees, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, for the Democratic and Republican parties, respectively, still must be officially confirmed as their party nominees, but delegate counts for both put them out of reach of their rivals.

Both parties will have nominating conventions in July—the Republicans will have theirs in Cleveland a week before the Democrats travel to Philadelphia.

As of this writing, Senator Bernie Sanders is still a declared candidate for the Democratic nomination. Many prominent news sources, however, have declared Secretary Clinton the presumptive nominee based on pledge delegates from primary elections and caucuses as well as so-called “super delegates,” party-designated voters who have declared their intention to support Clinton.

While the presidential primary elections have ended, there are still many Congressional primary elections yet to be held. Three incumbent Members of Congress have already lost their primaries, though one was due to a redistricting in North Carolina that forced two current Members of Congress to run against one another.

AHCA/NCAL will continue to monitor the election process and keep members updated on any important issues.Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

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